Archive for Brains

Your brain hallucinates your conscious reality. Billions of neurons in your brain are working together to generate a conscious experience

Posted in 2020, Health, Mind, science with tags , , , on April 4, 2020 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE
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Jill Bolte Taylor’s stroke of insight : A powerful story about how our brains define us & connect us to the world & to one another

Posted in 2020, Health, Mind, science with tags , , on April 4, 2020 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE

http://www.ted.com Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor had an opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: One morning, she realized she was having a massive stroke. As it happened — as she felt her brain functions slip away one by one, speech, movement, understanding — she studied and remembered every moment. This is a powerful story about how our brains define us and connect us to the world and to one another.

Jill Bolte Taylor speaking at TED on February ...

Jill Bolte Taylor speaking at TED on February 27, 2008 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

One morning in 1996, a blood vessel in Jill Bolte Taylor’s brain exploded. Within moments, her left lobe–the source of ego, analysis, judgement and context–began to fail her. And much to her shock, the Harvard-trained brain scientist felt great. She’d been given a ringside seat to her own stroke, and a host of powerful insights as a result. As Taylor shared with the audience at a recent TED conference, “I believe the more time we spend choosing to run the deep inner peace circuitry of our right hemispheres, the more peace we will project into the world, the more peaceful our planet will be.” Or as she put it another way to The New York Times last week, “Nirvana exists right now.” – 

Do you find my brain? - Auf der Suche nach mei...

Do you find my brain? – Auf der Suche nach meinem Gehirn (Photo credit: alles-schlumpf)

Jill Bolt TAYLOR, Her Powerful Story about Our Brains

Posted in 2016, spirituality with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2016 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE

Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor had an opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: One morning, she realized she was having a massive stroke. As it happened — as she felt her brain func…

Source: Jill Bolt TAYLOR, Her Powerful Story about Our Brains

For 650 million years Jellyfish have been giving Hope to Humans!

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , on July 26, 2015 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE

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If You Can Read This, It Means You Have A Strong Mind

Posted in 2015 with tags , , on May 28, 2015 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE

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Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor’s Stroke of Insight

Posted in 2014 with tags , , , , on December 22, 2014 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE

Neuroanatomist Jill Bolte Taylor had an opportunity few brain scientists would wish for: One morning, she realized she was having a massive stroke. As it happened — as she felt her brain functions slip away one by one, speech, movement, understanding — she studied and remembered every moment. This is a powerful story about how our brains define us and connect us to the world and to one another.

 

Each Half of the Brain Has Its Own Memory Storage

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , on June 22, 2011 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE


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http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2011/06/21/each-half-of-the-brain-has-its-own-memory-storage/

What’s the News: The left and right halves of the brain have separate stores for working memory, the information we actively keep in mind, suggests a study published online yesterday by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. People can, on average, hold only four pieces of information in working memory—say, where four strangers are seated in a room. The current study suggests that, in fact, working memory capacity is two plus two—two items stored in each side of the brain—rather than four items stored anywhere. This understanding could be used to design learning techniques and visual displays that maximize working memory capacity.

How the Heck:

The researchers had two monkeys—which, like humans, can on average hold four pieces of information in mind—do a standard working memory task used in both primates and people. The monkeys were shown between two and five squares on a screen. The squares disappeared for a moment, and when they reappeared, one square had changed color. To get a reward, monkeys had to look at the square that had changed.
While the monkeys did the task, the researchers used electrodes to record their brain activity in two areas: the parietal cortex (which helps us take in what we see) and the frontal cortex (the seat of working memory).
As in earlier studies, monkeys made more mistakes as the number of squares increased. (To go back to the strangers sitting in a room, it’s as if one of the people had wandered into the hall and someone else had taken his seat while your back was turned. If there were only four people, you’d probably realize what had happened; if there were ten people, or thirty, it would be much harder to notice the change.)
But the team noticed that it wasn’t the total number of squares onscreen that mattered so much as how many squares were on each half of the screen. (Each half of the brain processes visual information from the opposite side of the visual field.) The monkeys were just as good at remembering items on the right side of the screen when more squares were added to the left side, and vice versa.
“[The monkeys] have two independent, smaller capacities in the right and left halves of the visual space. It was as if two separate brains — the two cerebral hemispheres — were looking at different halves of visual space,” said neuroscientist Earl Miller, one of the researchers, in a prepared statement.
Looking at the neural recordings let the scientists suss out when and how the brain was overloaded with information. They found that the limitation on working memory came from the monkeys’ ability to take in information rather than to remember it. Too many squares overloaded the cells in the parietal cortex; they simply couldn’t encode that much information.

TO BE CONTINUED What’s the Context


READ FULL ARTICLE ON
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2011/06/21/each-half-of-the-brain-has-its-own-memory-storage/

Jill Bolt Taylor : An Insight into the Brain

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , on May 2, 2011 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE

Eight weeks to a better brain Meditation study shows changes associated with awareness, stress

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on March 7, 2011 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE

EXCERPT

Increased Solar Activity and Human Consciousness

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 3, 2011 by THE BOLDCORSICANFLAME AND CAPITAINE FLAMME INTREPIDE