Archive for Indian Ocean

AN OVERVIEW OF THE DAMAGE CAUSED BY RISING WATER AROUND THE WORLD

Posted in 2013 with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on November 9, 2013 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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One house remains above water level

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An orange line painted on the condemned house – and Robb Braidwood, Office of Emergency Management Chesapeake, Virginia – shows the usual high water in the area.” A storm is not even necessary , says Braidwood. Heavy rains and winds in the wrong direction at a high enough tide. “

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As seawater warms, it expands. This thermal expansion accounts for about a third of the current rise in sea level. The melting of mountain glaciers account for another third.By 2100, it will no doubt raises several centimeters sea level, but no more. The volume of ice mountains remains small enough.

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Its contribution is small today but worrying sign, its surface began to melt in the summer. The ice sheet contains enough water to raise sea levels by almost 7.5 m.

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The East Antarctica seems fairly stable. However, the warming of the ocean mine parts of the ice sheet of West Antarctica. The future of the cap, such as Greenland, is very uncertain.

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A coastal defense work today protects Malé, the capital of Maldives. This archipelago in the Indian Ocean is the lowest country in the world and flat. Rising seas could force Maldivians to abandon their homeland before 2100. More than 100 000 people live on this island of 1.9 km2.

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Dangerously exposed to the next typhoon, these families homeless crowd into coastal slums in Manila, Philippines. Rapid land subsidence worse by the global sea level rise.

South Africa in pole position for magnetic shift

Posted in 2013 with tags , , , , , , , on September 3, 2013 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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Cape TownEarth’s magnetic field is undergoing significant shifts, and South Africa has front row seats to observe the changes.

Satellites and magnetic observatories have recorded stirrings in the magnetic field – some areas weakening, some strengthening – which suggest that our planet is headed for a reversal of its magnetic poles in the next few hundred years.

If that happens, compasses which usually point north will point south. Animals which use the magnetic field for navigation such as birds, whales and sharks will find it difficult to migrate along their usual routes. Our magnetic navigation systems will have to be recalibrated.

And while South Africans won’t be able to watch the aurora visible over the equator during the pole switch, we are in a prime position to monitor the process because we are situated between the two areas of greatest change in the magnetic field.

Just south-west of Cape Town is the region where the largest decrease was recorded by satellites between 1980 and 2001: -8 percent. And not too far east of South Africa is the region in the Indian Ocean where the largest increase was recorded, of +3 percent.

At the magnetic observatory in Hermanus, one of four in the country, the geomagnetic field has decreased by more than 20 percent since 1941.

MORE OF THE ARTICLE ON

http://www.iol.co.za/scitech/science/space/sa-in-pole-position-for-magnetic-shift-1.1571560#.UiXITNLp3nW

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