Archive for Sun

A Hole in the Sun’s Atmosphere is Spewing a stream of solar wind as fast as 700 km/s (1.6 million mph)

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Extreme Weather, Galaxy with tags , , , , , , on June 14, 2017 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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Spewing a stream of solar wind as fast as 700 km/s (1.6 million mph), a hole in the sun’s atmosphere is turning toward Earth.

Forecasters expect the stream to reach our planet on June 15th or 16th with a 40% chance of minor G1-class geomagnetic storms when it arrives. 

High-latitude sky watchers should be alert for auroras in the nights ahead, especially in the southern hemisphere where deepening autumn darkness favors visibility.

Visit Spaceweather.com for more information and updates. 

A large canyon-shaped hole in the sun’s atmosphere is facing Earth and spewing a stream of solar wind toward our planet

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy, Uncategorized with tags , , , , on March 25, 2017 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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GEOMAGNETIC STORM WATCH:

A large canyon-shaped hole in the sun’s atmosphere is facing Earth and spewing a stream of solar wind toward our planet.

Estimated time of arrival: 2 to 3 days from now. This has prompted NOAA forecasters to issue a geomagnetic storm watch for March 28th when storm levels could reach category G2–that is, moderately strong.

Auroras could descend from the Arctic Circle to northern-tier US states from New York to Wisconsin to Washington. Visit Spaceweather.com to learn more about the incoming solar wind stream and what makes it so potent.

Sunday, Feb. 26th: Something strange is about to happen in the southern hemispher

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , , , , , on February 25, 2017 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

On Sunday, Feb. 26th, the Moon will pass in front of the sun, covering as much as 99% of the solar disk.

It’s an annular solar eclipse, shown here in an animation from ShadowandSubstance.com

Annular eclipses occur when the Moon passes dead center in front of the sun, but does not completely cover it. At maximum eclipse, an intense “ring of fire” surrounds the mountainous limb of the Moon.

The narrow path of annularity snakes across five countries: Chile and Argentina in South America; Angola, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Zambia in Africa. People in those countries can see the ring of fire for almost a minute and a half. Outside that path, the eclipse will be partial.  This means the sun will turn into a crescent—a slender one near the path of annularity and a fatter one away from it. Caution: Always use safe solar filters to observe the sun.

Observers in the eclipse zone are encouraged to look down as well–for instance, at the sun-dappled ground beneath leafy trees.  The sight of a thousand crescent-shaped sunbeams swaying back and forth on a grassy lawn or sidewalk is unforgettable.

More on

http://spaceweather.com

Amazing Cylinder Seen on Stereo Ahead COR2 Camera Feed.

Posted in 2017, astronomy with tags , , , , on February 19, 2017 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

NOAA forecasters say there is 70% chance of polar geomagnetic storms

Posted in 2017, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 17, 2017 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

This is a “coronal hole” (CH)–a region where the sun’s magnetic field opens up and allows solar wind to escape.  Material is flowing from this coronal hole at speeds exceeding 650 km/s (1.5 million mph).

NOAA forecasters say there is 70% chance of polar geomagnetic storms on Jan. 18th when a fast-moving stream of solar wind hits Earth’s magnetic field. The Arctic light show, however, could begin even earlier.

A co-rotating interaction region (CIR) just in front of the solar wind stream is expected to reach Earth during the late hours of Jan 17th.

CIRs are transition zones between slow- and fast-moving solar wind. They contain density gradients and shock waves that often spark auroras. Free: Aurora Alerts

The incoming stream of solar wind is flowing from a large hole in the sun’s atmosphere. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory photographed the crescent-shaped structure directly facing Earth on Jan. 17th

More on:

http://spaceweather.com

Sun: Return of The Big Coronal Hole

Posted in 2016, astronomy, Galaxy with tags , , , , , , , , on November 21, 2016 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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At the end of October, a hole in the sun’s atmosphere lashed Earth’s magnetic field with solar wind, sparking moderately-strong geomagnetic storms and almost a full week of Arctic auroras.

News flash:  It’s back.  The same “coronal hole” is turning toward Earth again. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory photographed the structure on Nov. 20th.

Coronal holes are regions in the sun’s atmosphere where the magnetic field peels back and allows solar wind to escape.

Since our last encounter with this hole in late October it has been transiting the farside of the sun, carried around by the sun’s 27-day rotation.  Now that it is back we can see that the hole is not quite as large as it was a month ago–but it is still impressive, covering more than 1/4th of the visible solar disk.

More of this article on:

http://spaceweather.com

New Evidence Indicates Mysterious Planet is Tilting the Sun- Causing Solar System Wobble

Posted in 2016, astronomy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on October 26, 2016 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI
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WATCH VIDEO ON YOU TUBE:
22 oct. 2016

The mysterious, unseen Planet Nine could be causing the sun to tilt and adding a “wobble” to the solar system, according to a new study.

Caltech researchers announced the findings at the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Sciences meeting Wednesday — nine months after the group initially reported about the massive planet lurking at the outer reaches of our solar system.

Planet 9 Effects on our Solar System:

https://youtu.be/h72tABvkLAo

A high-speed stream of solar wind is buffeting Earth’s magnetic field today & Strange Sunset

Posted in 2016, astronomy with tags , , , , , on September 28, 2016 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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GEOMAGNETIC STORM TODAY: As predicted, a high-speed stream of solar wind is buffeting Earth’s magnetic field today. Since it arrived on Sept. 27th, the stream has sparked G1- and G2-classgeomagnetic storms and bright auroras around the Arctic Circle.

NOAA forecasters say the storms could intensify on Sept. 28th as the stream reaches peak speeds in excess of 700 km/s. High-latitude sky watchers should remain alert for auroras. Free: Aurora Alerts

“I can’t get enough of these lights,” says Katarina Srsenova, who took this picture last night in Iceland’s Thingvellir National Park

http://spaceweather.com

More photos are pouring in. Browse the gallery for the latest sightings:

Realtime Aurora Photo Gallery

THE STRANGE THING ABOUT THIS SUNSET….Yesterday at sunset, Mila Zinkova was looking west from Pacifica CA when “something strange happened,” she reports. The sun split into multiple layers and a green flash appeared. But, that wasn’t the strange thing.

Temperature inversions above the ocean surface frequently distort the setting sun off the Califonia coast. “Take a closer look at the picture,” urges Zinkova. “Where did that vertical pillar of light at the bottom come from?” Scroll down for the answer:

“It’s the spout of a whale,” she explains.

In the complete video she recorded, multiple spouts can be seen grazing the bottom of the miraged sun. “Of course the sunset was unusual not because of whales, but because of some very complex temperature inversions in the atmosphere. While the lowest sun was setting, producing green flashes, the upper suns were not in a hurry to leave. They kept disappearing and reappearing.”

Just another evening on the California coast…. Turn up the volume and watch it again.

http://spaceweather.com

Solar wind flowing from an unusually large coronal hole on the sun

Posted in 2016, astronomy with tags , , , , on September 3, 2016 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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A stream of very fast moving solar wind is buffeting Earth’s magnetic field this weekend, and this is causing geomagnetic storms around the poles.

A twilight display in Lofoten, Norway, on Sept. 3rd prompted one photographer to move his dinner table outside

http://spaceweather.com

 

 

As solar activity declines, cosmic rays intensify

Posted in 2016, astronomy with tags , , , , , , , , , , on August 29, 2016 by MARIE EMMANUELLE QUILICHINI

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Researchers have long known that solar activity and cosmic rays have a yin-yang relationship. As solar activity declines, cosmic rays intensify.

Lately, solar activity has been very low indeed. Are cosmic rays responding? The answer is “yes.” Spaceweather.com and the students of Earth to Sky Calculus have been using helium balloons to monitor cosmic rays in the stratosphere over California. Their latest data show an increase of almost 13% since 2015.

Cosmic rays, which are accelerated toward Earth by distant supernova explosions and other violent events, are an important form of space weather. They can seed clouds, trigger lightning, and penetrate commercial airplanes. Furthermore, there are studies (#1, #2, #3, #4) linking cosmic rays with cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death in the general population.

Why are cosmic rays intensifying? The main reason is the sun. Solar storm clouds such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs) sweep aside cosmic rays when they pass by Earth. During Solar Maximum, CMEs are abundant and cosmic rays are held at bay. Now, however, the solar cycle is swinging toward Solar Minimum, allowing cosmic rays to return. Another reason could be the weakening of Earth’s magnetic field, which helps protect us from deep-space radiation.

TO BE CONTINUED ON

http://spaceweather.com

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